Bee Palace

13 amazing facts about bees

September 13th, 2017

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OK, so we know that as you’re reading this there’s probably a pretty good chance you already have a lot of respect for the bees in this world, but it can never hurt to remind ourselves why they’re so important – and fascinating. Read the rest of this entry »

 

 

6 bee-friendly seeds to sow now

August 3rd, 2017

Rudyard Kipling once said, ‘Gardens are not made by singing “Oh how beautiful!” and sitting in the shade’. It’s true, of course but come August, a lot of the hard work has been done in the garden and, save for the ever-ongoing task of weeding and deadheading, it’s a month to really enjoy the spoils of all that labour. Read the rest of this entry »

 

 

11 things you should know about the Red Mason Bee

May 30th, 2017

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When you say ‘bee’ chances are most of us immediately think of honey or the almost-cuddly bumble bee, but in fact the world of our favourite pollinators is considerably more diverse. There is just one species of honeybee, 27 known bumblebee types, yet more than 250 different species of other, solitary bees, of which the Red Mason bee is one. Read the rest of this entry »

 

 

Plant this now for Pollinators: alliums

May 15th, 2017

Plant this now for pollinators (5)

 

 

Heritage orchards: the ultimate bee-friendly forage

May 1st, 2017

local fruits come in all colours and shapes

When we started beepalace, one of the statistics that we found truly mind-boggling was that it can take around 20,000 honey bees to pollinate an acre of apple orchard but just 250 solitary bees. Isn’t that amazing? Read the rest of this entry »

 

 

A bee-friendly container for National Gardening Week

April 14th, 2017

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Whether your garden is measured in acres or square feet, there are plenty of ways to incorporate a bit of colour and some bee-friendly plants into the mix and, as it’s National Gardening Week (and a bank holiday weekend, no less!), there’s no time like the present to start. Some of you may remember the container we planted up last autumn, and we got so many enthusiastic comments that we thought we’d share another quick, easy and scalable scheme for your enjoyment.  Read the rest of this entry »

 

 

Blooms for Bees – mapping Britain’s Bumblebees

March 31st, 2017

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An exciting new research project launches in the first week of April, which aims to gather more information about our bumblebees by inviting volunteers to conduct short 5 minute surveys in their gardens, much as the RSPB do with their annual Big Garden Birdwatch. We were delighted to have a chat with Judith Conroy, one of the researchers for Blooms for Bees, to find out a little more…

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Colourful Winter Containers

November 17th, 2016

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One of the most common questions asked of gardeners, garden designers and plantsmen and women is how to brighten up the garden in winter. Sure, it’s certainly not as easy as it is during the summer, but if you’re really savvy it’s entirely possible to create a single container that not only creates colourful interest through the darkest months, but is extremely pollinator-friendly as well. Read the rest of this entry »

 

 

The Asian Hornet & Our Native Pollinators

November 3rd, 2016

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Pollinators are vital to our ecosystems, so it’s worrying that after years of concern, the first Asian hornet sighting was confirmed in the UK in September. Unlike our native hornet, its Asian counterpart has the rather dubious distinction of preying on honey bee colonies and thereby poses a very real threat to colony numbers – as well as other native species. Read the rest of this entry »

 

 

“The bees’ needs”

April 7th, 2016

We are very pleased to have embarked on some co-branding with Seedball which is part of Project Maya (their aim is to provide meadowland in urban spaces throughout the world! Inspiring!).

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